Tagged: Artscape Theatre

Review of Cape Town Production: Torchbearers

Torchbearers -full cast  + choir + musicians in Cape Town

Torchbearers -full cast + choir + musicians in Cape Town

“The words are theirs, the dream is ours” the Zulu narrator of Torchbearers calls out. His words reverberate through different generations and across diverse cultures as we piece together the
story of two star-crossed lovers from very different walks of life.

Last night’s show of Torchbearers at the Artscape Theatre blew me away. Not only was the acting incredible from the diverse cast of South African and Welsh performers; but the story, the costumes, the choreography – everything was awe-inspiring.

The musical tells the story of two young lovers: Thembesile, a young Zulu girl, and Gerwyn, a Welsh actor, who meet on the set of the 1964 classic film, Zulu, in Johannesburg. The two fall in love but are torn asunder by apartheid and destined never to see one another again. Although they spend years apart and lead completely separate lives, their longing for one another never diminishes and we share their hope of a future together. We experience not only their past but also how it shapes their present and future. We watch as their children and grandchildren grow up in the same world they did but experience it differently due to the immense changes that have occurred since their own youth.

Without exception all the actors did a brilliant job, but the two leads, Zoliswa Euphonia Kawe and Nathan Sussex, did a particularly remarkable job reliving the memories and showcasing the hurt and loss their characters both experienced in their lives.

This beautiful story was written and directed by Laurence Allan who was inspired by his own experiences watching Zulu as a child. With the help of Valleys Kids, a community development charity, his intention was to unite the youth of the South Wales Valleys (one of the most deprived areas in Europe) with South Africa’s townships through a blend of acting, circus performance, dance, music and song. And he has succeeded superbly. This hodge podge of creativity blends together to create a truly beautiful work of art that celebrates and brings together two very diverse cultures.

And it’s this amazing combination of all forms of creativity that calls upon the skills of many local South African companies. The dancers are from the local upliftment project Dance For All and, choreographed by Christoper Kindo, they effortlessly dominate the stage encapsulating the raw emotion of the actors, providing a beautiful backdrop to all the scenes. Combined with the stylised sounds of the Cape Philharmonic Youth Orchestra, the alluring vocals of the Fezeka Voice choir and the amazing feats of the Zip Zap Circus School, this show has it all. Rich in cultural history and a beautiful fusion of two cultures, this heartfelt story shouldn’t be missed.

REVIEW by Claire Pokorchak
- What’s On in Cape Town

Torchbearers was at the Artscape Theatre 8 – 11 November 2012.

About Me

The 2000 L'etape du Tour Carpentras to Mont Ventoux

The 2000 L’etape du Tour Carpentras to Mont Ventoux

For the forty years that constitutes my adult life I have been writing plays, riding bikes and trying to cook the perfect Sunday dinner. I am not sure which has provided the more joy and heartache but somehow writing plays has become my career though I sometimes wonder whether one of the other pursuits may have been more remunerative.

I practice all of these dark arts in Pontypridd, the town in the heart of the South Wales Valleys where I was born and where I have chosen to live. I trained as a teacher in Manchester, before running away to join the theatre as an actor. This was with precious little experience, as the first play I saw, I was also in; but then the first play I went on to write, I also directed, operated the lights and drove the van that transported the set and the actors. This was OVER THE WALL AND BACK AGAIN, a story set in the 1985 miners’ strike about a miner’s wife in the Rhondda running the London marathon. Strangely, this instigated the reverse journey from London, where I was living, back home to South Wales.

For the next twenty five years I followed the well signposted route of received wisdom where you write plays and hand them over to a director.

A route that brought me regular commissions, a few accolades and even some awards. These have included the 2007 Theatre Wales Award for best new play FLOWERS FROM TUNISIA which dealt with dementia and managed in the words of critics, to be both funny and moving, and for radio the Broken and Blue award for my BBC Radio 3 play, I THOUGHT I HEARD BUDDY BOLDEN SHOUT with a soundtrack by Rob Smith and featuring South African trumpeter, Claude Deppa.

Both music and comedy have been prevailing backdrops to all my plays from an octogenarian, black saxophonist in A BLOW TO BUTE STREET for the Sherman Theatre, to three Marianne Faithfulls (who I had the privilege of meeting in Cardiff) in DANGEROUS AQUAINTANCES for Hijinx Theatre.

This fusion of drama and music reached a dizzying height with TORCHBEARERS, a project initiated by local charity, Valleys Kids that linked the Valleys of south Wales with the Townships of Capetown, as part of the 2012 Cultural Olympiad. This involved up to two hundred performers and musicians, with music by Paula Gardiner, in a production that played in the Donald Gordon Theatre in the Wales Millennium Centre and Artscape Theatre in Cape Town in a Co-production with Artscape thanks to the support of Michael Maas and Marlene le Roux. I also did my best to make it funny.

More importantly this was a play where I reclaimed my right to directorship and plotted a different route to the future where I would like to go against the grain and direct my own plays. Of course this will struggle to gain precedence over riding my bike over Welsh mountains while seeking the answer to life’s eternal dilemma. Do Yorkshire puddings have any place alongside roast chicken?